Three New WPF SVL Controls!


WPF SVL Has New Controls!

WPF SVL Has New Controls!

It’s been a long time since I’ve contributed anything to the code world, but this drought is coming to an end. Soon I will be launching a little application for musicians that I’ve been working on casually over the last year or so. As part of that effort (of which you will hear more soon), I’ve updated WPF SVL with a few new controls! As always, the controls are open source and free to use in your own projects (professional or personal)!

The Equalizer

The Equalizer Control

The Equalizer Control

The first new control is the equalizer. The equalizer is really just a fancy collection of vertical sliders with a few other niceties that are illustrated in the various theme files. The control’s value is an array of floating point numbers (with an element for each equalizer band) that allows you to simultaneously get and set all equalizer values.

The Digital Clock

The Digital Clock

The Digital Clock

Next up we have an LED-style digital clock display control. A lot of audio applications feature a running clock, so I thought I would introduce my own version of a fast-rendering digital clock to WPF.

The Time Editor

The Time Editor

The Time Editor

Finally, we have the TimeEditor control. One of the most obvious holes in WPF’s default control library is a numeric spinner control. This is a play on that control with fields for hours, minutes, and seconds (up t o 1/100th of a second). I’ve taken a stab at masking input and validating time logic (e.g., no more than 60-seconds per hour).

Grab the new controls on the WPF SVL CodePlex Site!

ZenLibrary – Cleanse Your Music Library (And Thus Your Soul)

ZenLibrary's Main Screen

ZenLibrary's Main Screen

Here’s my latest “weekend project.” It was supposed to be a little tool I wrote for myself on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Then I decided I would release it to you all, and that causes a project to really balloon in scope. I had to worry about it crashing, clean up my code so no one could blackmail me with it later, restructure the architecture to be generic, blah, blah, blah. But, I’ll save all those boring details for the next blog post aimed at programmers. This is supposed to be the post where I tell you what this project does.

Thus, I present to you: ZenLibrary. It’s a simple tool for all of you people as obsessed with sanitizing your media library as I am. You give it your music library, and it tells you all the things wrong with it (presumably so you can fix them). Step 1, you tell it where your music library is. Step 2, you choose what rules you want to test against your music library. Step 3, you fix the problems it finds.

Here’s the feature list:

  • Simple, streamlined UI.
  • Comes with a set of common criteria for sanitizing a music library
  • Easily extensible rule architecture
  • User preferences saved between sessions.
  • Integrates with MP3Tag to quickly launch an editor on any errors it finds.
  • Double clicking any result takes you straight to that folder (again, for easy editing)

Requirements:

Download ZenLibrary 0.4

For people interested in extending it or getting their hands on the source code, be sure to check out my next post on doing just that.

Version Updates:

9-14-2009: Release 0.4

- Fixed icon error causing crashes in Windows XP and Vista
- Moved included rules out to their own assembly.

9-13-2009: Release 0.3

- Created ZenLibrary.Rulebase.dll for plugin support

9-12-2009: Release 0.2

- Added initial support for M4A, OGG, and FLAC files.
- Added detailed error information for tests that are unable to complete (red exclamation circles).
- Changed “Stereo” test method to a simple check on the number of audio channels.
- Fixed bug in album art directory scanning
- Disabled rule options while scanning (to prevent thread collisions)